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Inside Pedro Cerrano’s baseball card collection

UPDATE: The mystery card is definitely a San Francisco Giant and it’s definitely not a standard-sized card.

For a voodoo warrior who has problems getting along with his teammates, Pedro Cerrano sure does show a soft spot for baseball greats and their baseball cards showing in his locker doesn’t he?

From left just above Jobu, that’s a 1984 Donruss Eddie Murray Diamond Kings card, a 1968 Topps Game Roberto Clemente, a mystery card, a 1971 Topps Willie McCovey, a 1954 Topps Hank Aaron rookie card and a 1952 Topps Jackie Robinson.

Anyone have any ideas on the mystery card? My leading guess is that it might be a 1957 Topps Clemente. I’m admittedly not sure, though, as it also looks like it could be a Willie Mays or Monte Irvin mug. Plus, the card looks like it could be narrower like a 1968 Topps 3D card or a Kellogg’s card, but I can’t match it anywhere.

– Lou Brown



What if Pedro Cerrano had a 1989 Donruss baseball card?

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Once you got to know him, you’d find that Pedro Cerrano had some serious charisma.

In fact, I could see him running for office someday. (And, I swear that guy on the Keifer Sutherland show, 24, looks a lot like him. But, anyway…)

Sure, Cerrano’s voodoo freaked out some veterans in the clubhouse (well, at least Eddie Harris admitted that to me), but Jobu helped Cerrano with the curveball and that’s all that matters. Harris warmed up to Jobu, too, after a freak accident that first summer — so it all paid off in the end.

Believe it or not, Charlie Donovan considered sending Cerrano down to Triple-A early in his rookie season, but we decided we needed his bat in the lineup and then looked to move Vaughn. Good thing we got him some glasses and Cerrano finally pulled it around.

Cerrano’s sophomore season was another story … but Jake, Duke and Pep told me that Isuro “Kamikazi” Tanaka was a real help.

Something about marbles.

Maybe they’re a good stress-reliever? I’ll look into that.

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What if Roger Dorn had a 1989 Donruss baseball card?

Roger Dorn.

I never really liked that guy — probably because his car cost more than I made in my last five seasons managing the Toledo Mud Hens combined.

Then, again, I did manage to get him a good deal on some whitewalls at Tire World. After that — and our pennant — he gave me a Rolex, so I can’t complain.

Once he got over my stance on calisthenics, and stopped acting like he was centerstage in the Playa Tijuana bullfighting stadium, he became quite a spark for my team. For some reason, he also seemed to listen to Jake Taylor a little more as the season progressed. And he always seemed to light a fire under Ricky Vaughn, too.

He’s good with his investments, so I’m sure he’s rebounded quite well from his short-lived stint as the Indians owner.

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What if Eddie Harris had a 1989 Donruss baseball card?

pg2-mem-front-harrisEddie Harris may have been an old junk-baller, but he got the job done for us against the Yankees and that’s all that matters.

And those damned sportswriters need to lay off on the conspiracies about Crisco, Bardahl, Vagisil, Vaseline and especially jalapenos.

Those were just his endorsement deals, guys. (Well, except Vagisil. I don’t know where they got that from … )

Ol’ Eddie put plenty on the ball — just like Hall of Famer Gaylord Perry.

And it’s his veteran arm and presence in the clubhouse that mattered most.

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What if Willie Mays Hayes had a 1989 Donruss baseball card?

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Looking back on baseball’s steroid era and all of its allegedly tainted stars, one would have never guessed that some fingers might be pointing at Willie Mays Hayes.

hayesI don’t think I buy it. I mean, the guy’s listed at 160 pounds on our roster. And this guy was more concerned about his shoes and his batting gloves than working out. (Great taste in cars, too.)

Just like Tony LaRussa‘s talented squads in Oakland and St. Louis, my entire roster has always been clean. Lou Brown doesn’t tolerate cheaters. (Well, except Eddie Harris — but he was only around my first season.)

Sure, Hayes bulked up over the winter after his rookie year — probably to star in Black Hammer, White Lightning with Jesse “The Body” Ventura (great flick; see the trailer after the jump).

But some people say he looked a lot different in Major League II. And, sure, he developed some power. But I still don’t buy it.

Then again, that guy sure could do a lot of push-ups …

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What if Harry Doyle had a 1989 Donruss baseball card?

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What can you say about Harry Doyle? The guy wears his team pride on his sleeve just like he wears his Jack Daniel’s behind his right ear.

Everybody in my clubhouse knows I’m not one for giving inspirational addresses — and I could care less about sportswriters. But the voice of the Tribe is a Hall of Famer, and the host of Tepee Talk gets my attention when he’s on the air.

We share a common bond — we can’t stand Jack Parkman or Rachel Phelps. Now that I’m retired, I can say it. Harry, though, is still behind the microphone to this day.

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What if Jobu had a 1989 Donruss baseball card?

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Normally, I’d never be a fan of non-Indians personnel in my team’s locker room, but this guy made things happen. (Sorry, Duke and Pepper.)

I’m not big on the whole religion thing — my momma always thought a belt was effective — but Pedro Cerrano‘s spiritual advisor, Jobu, was a master of inspiring clutch performances.

(Forget that Derek Jeter guy…)

If any non-player deserved a baseball card, Jobu was it.

Unfortunately, nobody knows the whereabouts of Jobu today. That’s a shame, because he could seriously help out some players in MLB today. (Read: A-Rod.)

After all, he did plenty for helping Cerrano with the curveball, and I had to think that he inspired ol’ Eddie Harris in our playoff game vs. the Yankees.

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