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Did you know … Fleer pulled Pedro Cerrano’s baseball card from its 1989 set while fixing the Billy Ripken FF error?

Did you know Fleer pulled this card from its 1989 baseball card set while fixing the Billy Ripken error?

Pedro Cerrano appeared on card No. 402 until someone spotted him and replaced him with Dave Clark. It was a change that was so subtle it didn’t even require a change to the alphabetical order on the checklist.

(We heard that Fleer’s CEO just couldn’t allow the Tribe’s voodoo warrior on a card — he thought it gave off the wrong impression to youngsters. Little did he know what was on the knob of Ripken’s bat. But then that’s all just an urban myth, anyway … right?)

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What if Upper Deck had gone a different direction with card No. 1 back in 1989?

Now that Upper Deck is effectively out of the market for Major League Baseball cards, it’s also out of the market for Major League baseball cards, too, and that got Lou Brown thinking about what went wrong along the way.

What if Upper Deck had gone with a different Star Rookie in its inaugural 1989 baseball card set instead of Ken Griffey Jr.? What if my man, Wild Thing had been there instead?

Things would have looked a lot different today. I’m telling you.

— Lou Brown



Will you find these in 2010 Upper Deck baseball card packs?

Since Upper Deck has decided to go all renegade and use MLB logos on its 2010 baseball card set — a move that has the attention of Major League Baseball — I just want to know one thing …

Will any of the 1990 buyback cards inserted into packs look anything like this one?

I still haven’t found a Pedro Cerrano card in any of the backs I have purchased … what about you?

— Lou Brown



I missed Eddie Harris in our second season …

I’ll tell you right now, Eddie Harris was the glue that held our pitching staff together in 1988.

And he also had all the best lines in Major League.

Watch the video and learn.

— Lou Brown



Long-lost treasure II: More Major League minor league cards

The off-season is like watching Major League: Back To The Minors — you just can’t wait for it to end.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not the worst baseball movie I have ever seen — even if it takes the Major League name created by my boys, my Cleveland Indians, and stomps it into the ground complete with a bee sting in the ass.

From the mascot? We could only be so lucky — that’s one big bee. (And he’s got an attitude as you can see at left.)

It’s worth watching once, OK maybe twice, just so you can get the full impact of computer-generated baseballs — from the pitcher’s hand to the plate and off the bat and into the outfield — along with Ted McGinley.

The Ted McGinley.

(Can’t hate Scott Bakula, err Gus Cantrell … he’s all this movie’s got.)

If it had nothing to do with the Major League franchise, then some of the players might be acceptable, funny, characters. But what they did to Pedro Cerrano once again?

And how did Roger Dorn find all that money to buy the Minnesota Twins when “that bitch” Rachel Phelps took him to the cleaners when he owned the Tribe? And when did Harry Doyle lose his job in Cleveland?

Painful.

But at least there are baseball cards.

See them all below.

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Long-lost treasure: Pedro Cerrano’s Buzz baseball card

I’d never actually seen one until Saturday when it arrived in my mailbox … Pedro Cerrano‘s only minor league baseball card from the trainwreck known as Major League: Back To The Minors.

Ain’t it a classic?

— Lou Brown



Lou Brown hates the off-season
December 2, 2009, 5:08 am
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

Things have been slow around here not because there’s not plenty of Major League goodness, but because I hate the off-season. While Major League is always in season, it’s just tougher to get into baseball mode when there’s, well, no baseball.

That said, I do have something in the works coming soon…

Until then, poke around on youhitlikeshit.com and you might find some cool stuff.



I have another reason to believe in calisthenics (and you can guess what I think of this one)

dorninscribed

Lou Brown has been known to pick up an autograph or two — call them mementos of my team — but I’m not sure if this one (sold on eBay from JG Autographs Inc.) will join the ol’ collection.

It’s not because I already own three Corbin Bernsen-signed … err Roger Dorn … items.

And it’s not because I don’t dislike the idea of inscriptions from the film — or that this one’s a tad overwhelming.

It’s just that I do believe in calisthenics.



Exclusive Discovery: The long lost 1990 Upper Deck Major League cards

1990UDparkman2 copy

Hot off the heels of yesterday’s landmark — some might say exclusive (but it’s much, much bigger than that) — find, we have gotten our hands on the cards that were intended to be in the 1990 Upper Deck baseball set.

These feature the stars of Major League II — a few guys you have heard of and, based on the box office attendance, some guys you haven’t.

(We won’t mention that the sequel came in 1994 — Major League II documents my squad’s second pennant-winning season, which is firmly 1989.)

— Lou Brown

See the rest of the “missing” 1990 cards after the jump.

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Exclusive first look world premiere: The 1989 Upper Deck cards you’ll never, ever find anywhere other than right here

1989vaughn5 copy

We’ve done some nosing around and have found this exclusive first look world premiere scoop of all scoops — the 14 cards pulled at the last second from the 1989 Upper Deck baseball card set. (Including a card of yours truly, Lou Brown.)

You see, Upper Deck had better things to do in 1989 than include a real Star Rookie named Ricky Vaughn in its inaugural baseball card set. (They instead opted for some bum named Ken Griffey Jr. for card No. 1.)

And they made some other last-second changes to the set — opting to not include managers, bench coaches, announcers and even some Major Leaguers in the 700-card first series.

My team was very, very disappointed. However, after 20 years these “missing”  cards have been discovered and can only be found here on my blog.

— Lou Brown

See all of the cards after the jump.

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